Hot Wench Summer: A Scroll Through Medieval TikTok

After three lockdowns there comes a time where you run out of things to do at home. There is only so much Netflix and walks within your own 2km radius that one can take before one may get a little fed up. Couple this with the boundless energy I seem to have concerning my work …

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The Curious Case of Unferth The Dane

Note: the featured image is a selection of the Lewis Chessmen. Unferth is a peculiar character in Beowulf that has left scholars puzzled for decades. Known for getting into an argument with the hero shortly after the Geats’ arrival to Denmark, scholars have struggled to pinpoint exactly who Unferth is: some have argued Unferth is …

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“Ver Natione Afer” [The Man by Nation of Africa]: The Body as Protest, From Medieval to Modern.

Note: Featured Image is a painting of Saint Maurice by Matthias Grünewald (circa 1520-1524 In the 21st century, we are no strangers to protests, particularly in the last year and a half between anti-lockdown protests, Black Lives Matter protests, and other such examples. Regardless of which side of the political spectrum you fall on, you …

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Presenting the Norse Myths in Modern Narratives and the Case of Netflix’s Ragnarok

Warning: This post may contain spoilers for season one of Ragnarok. Turn back now if you want to watch the series first before reading.  One series that I’ve stumbled upon during the course of three lockdowns is Ragnarok, a Norwegian series broadcast on Netflix. Produced by a Danish production company named SAM Productions, it is …

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“Now if you don’t mind, I’ve got a city to keep”: Exploring Gender in the Jarls of Skyrim and Its Links to Norse Mythology and Beowulf.

I have recently begun yet another replay of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim and as a scholar of Old English and Old Norse, one cannot help but notice many of the parallels or direct references to the culture and literature of these eras, especially when one is nearing 1000 hours on Steam (please don’t judge …

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Embracing Intersectional Approaches to Criticism

I have spent the last two weeks writing and editing a potential journal article in my effort to keep a toe dipped firmly in academia during my job hunt. This article discusses the appropriation of Old Norse religion by the alt-right and shows how a gender analysis of Sigurd and Loki can contradict the arguments …

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Bytes of Passion: The Historical Origins of “Stans”

Reader, you may or may not have noticed but the Internet is a strange place in 2020. From employment opportunities and heightened political campaigns, to the dedicated worship of young, handsome singers such as Niall Horan, there seems to be no limit to the types of content you can access online. If you have thought …

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The Man, The Hero, The Outlaw: The Shared Criticism of Traditional Masculinity in Beowulf and The Saga of Grettir The Strong.

Due to the circumstances surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic, the three conferences I was due to take part in were cancelled. While I am glad that organisers prioritised safety, it is unclear when I will next get to partake in a conference, and so I have decided to turn one of these papers into a blog …

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“To Dungeons Deep and Caverns Dim” How J. R. R. Tolkien Explores Gender and Masculinity in The Hobbit.

J. R. R. Tolkien’s novel The Hobbit has been picked apart and reconstructed by scholars on numerous occasions since its publication in 1937, responding in an essay that “In Dasent's words I would say: 'We must be satisfied with the soup that is set before us, and not desire to see the bones of the …

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“That Is Unparalleled Black Magic”: ‘The Wonders of the East’ And The Overlapping of Race and Gender in Depicting Monstrosity.

The Wonders of the East is an early medieval prose text that can be found in three manuscripts from England: Cotton Vitellius A. xv (the famous Beowulf manuscript), Cotton Tiberius B.v, and Bodleian 614. The oldest of the three is that found in the Beowulf manuscript, which scholars have dated to around the year 1000AD (although this date is …

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